Social Impact Bonds | Big Society Capital

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Social Impact Bonds

Action Homeless CEO Mark Grant writes why SITR could be a game-changer
Blog | 11 June 2019

Action Homeless CEO Mark Grant writes why he believes simplifying Social Investment Tax Relief (SITR) could be a game-changer that would allow them to raise flexible, patient and risk-tolerant capital, which they could use to provide more affordable housing to people affected by homelessness.

Events | 19 June 2018

Location: London, Big Society Capital

Time: 12.30-4.00pm

Events | 19 June 2018

Location: London, Big Society Capital

Time: 9.30am-1.30pm

Blog | 24 October 2017

In this post James Ronicle, Associate Director at Ecorys UK, describes the findings from the latest research collaboration between Ecorys UK and the Policy Innovation Research Unit (PIRU). The two research teams examined the reasons why 25 areas did, or did not, set up a social impact bond (SIB), and summarises the four factors that were essential in ensuring whether a SIB was launched.

Specialist fund providing flexible, risk taking finance to charities & social enterprises delivering improved social outcomes through payment-by-results contracts.

Blog | 9 May 2017

At some point in 2015 I started thinking that if I didn’t get to grips with understanding social finance I’d probably be a bit of a dinosaur.  In a world where money for preventive services is only likely to continue shrinking, any new avenues were worth knowing more about.  

Delivering a therapeutic foster care program to approximately 115 children across Birmingham, improving attitude and behaviour at school, and improving exam results.

Working with up to 4,040 young people with behavioural, mental health or wellbeing issues aged 14 to 17 in Greater Merseyside.

Providing therapeutic foster care for approximately 100 local children.

Delivering intensive mentoring and tenancy support for young people with complex needs who are at risk of involvement in crime, rough sleeping, substance misuse and long-term benefit dependency.